Every Radon Mitigation System is Custom Designed

Radon mitigation system cost varies dramatically depending on how the home is constructed. Radon system costs can range from $750 to $5,000 per home. The average cost range to install a radon mitigation system in an average single-family home is between $1,100 and $2,500, with $1,400 being the average.

Factors That Impact the Price of a Radon Mitigation System

The price of a radon system depends on many factors. Some factors only change the price a little, while other factors have a bigger effect. Here is a list of some of the factors that go into the cost of radon mitigation.

FACTOR WHAT MAY MAKE THE COST MORE EXPENSIVE
Size of the home Homes larger than 4,000 sq. ft.
Age of the home Older homes can be more difficult to fix
Foundation Cinder block or stone foundations
Siding Specialty siding (Dryvit, flagstone, asbestos, etc.)
Roofing material Specialty roofing (cedar shake, slate, etc.)
Height of building Tall buildings may require specialty ladders or lifts
Home Owner’s Association (HOA) requirements Some HOA’s are difficult to work with or have strict standards
Village requirements Some Village require permits and/or licensed electricians
Skeletal system already installed This will actually LOWER your price (if it was installed properly)
Basement size A basement larger than 2,000 sq. ft. may require additional suction point(s) and/or caulking
Finished basement characteristics May not allow for a good system location, may require more than one system
Excessive floor cracks in the basement Will require additional sealing
Floor drain(s) not trapped This is a radon source will need to be addressed
Radiant heat under the basement floor or slab-on-grade area Must know location so we don’t hit while drilling, may require Thermal Imaging Camera to locate
Groundwater sump pump Must be working or may need to be serviced
Battery backup sump pump Must be working or may need to be serviced, should be submersible style to achieve an airtight seal
Interior drain tile system May be a major radon entry route and may require special sealing
Crawl space An additional radon entry route at a different level than the basement
Crawl space composition A gravel or dirt crawl space requires special sealing
Crawl space size The size of a gravel or dirt crawl space is a factor in the pricing
Height of the crawl space If the gravel crawl space is less than 3′ tall, it is more difficult to work in
Crawl space access A crawl space must be accessible and have an opening a minimum of 2′ x 2′
Items stored/installed in crawl space A crawl space must be empty of debris, installed items such as a furnace, posts or shelving make it more difficult to seal
Insulation on walls of crawl space The bottom of the insulation will have to be removed, the insulation could contain asbestos if the home was built prior to 1973
Slab-on-grade areas of the home An additional radon entry route at a different level than the basemen
Ductwork or utilities in the slab Ductwork could affect the success of the system and may need to be sealed. Buried utilities may require concrete scanning using Ground Penetrating Radar
Additions to the home An additional radon entry route at different levels than the original home, a footing may separate the two areas, may require additional suction point(s)
High water table Makes it more difficult to draw air from underneath the home, may require additional suction point(s) or modifications to the sump pit/pump
Poor soil conditions (clay, sand, dirt, compacted gravel, etc.) Makes it more difficult to draw air from underneath the home, may require additional suction point(s) and/or a higher suction fan
Asbestos Asbestos siding, insulation or vermiculited may need to be professionally removed prior to a radon system being installed
Historically significan home May need to follow special Village standards
Power lines in the way May need Com Ed to cut power to the home in order to install the exterior exhaust pipe