• Suction Point
    We perform diagnostic testing as part of your system design, We drill a few small holes in your basement floor. Into one hole we puff smoke (shown), into another hole across the basement we insert a vaccuum. If the suction draws the smoke down into the hole, we know the system location will be successful and efficient.
  • Suction Point
    We will core a neat 3 1/2" to 5" diameter hole into the basement floor (lowest slab) in an unfinished area. We will create a void space of at least 216 cubic inches to make the system efficient. While drilling we utilize the best HEPA filter technology to minimize concrete dust being released into the air.
  • Suction Point
    We will caulk the suction pipe so that it remains airtight. We also properly secure and support the suction point by installing a coupling at the base of the suction point. This will allow system to properly collect the radon from the suction point for the life of the system. All of our piping is Schedule 40 PVC. We use professional grade caulk.
  • Suction Point
    This is a sub-slab ventilation system with the primary suction point neatly located in an unfinished corner of the basement and an additional suction point going through the foundation wall underneath the concrete crawl space floor.
  • Suction Point
    This photo shows a suction point installed in the concrete crawl space and additional suction point going under the garage slab. Installing a garage slab suction point will collect the radon gas that is remaining through the foundation wall into your basement. A garage slab suction point will get the radon levels as low as possible, which is Elliott and Associates' specialty.
  • Suction Point
    A gravel crawl space will be sealed with a 6 ml plastic membrane. The plastic will be secured to the walls of the crawl space with wood furring strips and sealant. This photo shows a secondary suction point installed under the plastic in the crawl space.
  • Suction Point
    This home has a suction point in the basement floor (shown) and a suction point in the gravel crawl space.
  • Suction Point
    This is an additional suction point that goes under a slab-on-grade portion of the home. Additional areas of the home that should be covered by a radon system include: crawl spaces, garage slab, front porch slab, slab additions, upper slabs, etc.
  • Suction Point
  • Suction Point
    Garage suction point penetrating through the top of the garage floor, which is the preferred method of installing a garage suction point.
  • Suction Point
    The system is designed to get amazing radon reduction, freeze protection and fire protection.
  • Suction Point
    This suction point goes into the home's drain tile system, allowing the radon system and water management system to work perfectly together.
  • Suction Point
    This is a picture of a test that confirms that the radon system is covering a specific area. Before and after the radon system is installed, a pressure field extension test is performed. The data helps to design the most efficient system and eliminates the “poke and hope method”. Yes it does take extra time, but the safety of the family and the sale of the building depends on us installing the right system.
  • Suction Point
    This is the IEMA sticker that must be placed on all radon mitigation systems. The number is like a license plate for a car but is a license plate for your radon mitigation system.
  • Suction Point
    This photo shows poor soil conditions (sand and compacted soil) that could potentially affect the success of the system as well as increase the number of suction points that this home will require.
  • Suction Point
    We protect your radiant heat system. Radiant heat consists of embedded coils in the cement floor that heat the floor. When we drill our suction point into your cement floor, we do not want to damage your buried systems! We have the ability to identify the location of your radiant heat system prior to drilling into the cement. This photo shows what we see when we use our thermal imaging camera to identify a radiant heat system. Call us for details
  • Suction Point
    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is used to protect the sale and keep money in the pocket of the seller or building owner. GPR identifies buried electrical, plumbing, footings, and foundation. This is one of the most important steps prior to conducting Pressure Field Extension (PFE) tests because it identifies safe areas to drill. Many "Poke and Hope" mitigation companies are risk takers and do not discuss this process. Their luck will eventually run out and you better hope it is not at your house or building.